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DHM Plus Capsules

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PRODUCT INFORMATION

Pure Nootropics’ DHM Plus is formulated with ingredients to help you recover from the unwanted after-effects of alcohol consumption.

  • Dihydromyricetin (DHM):
    • May decrease acetaldehyde (the toxic metabolite of alcohol) in humans (ref)*
    • May improve lipid metabolism (ref)*
    • May lessen the effects of alcohol consumption (in rats) (ref)*
    • May reduce oxidative stress on the liver after alcohol consumption (in mice) (ref)*
  • N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine (NAC):
    • May provide restorative effects to liver tissue after alcohol consumption (in rats) (ref)*
    • May reduce the adverse after-effects of alcohol consumption (in rats) (ref)*
  • Magnesium, Zinc and Vitamin B12:
    • Promotes replenishment of essential minerals and vitamins*

DHM+ Benefits

 

If you are interested in offering protection to your body

and reducing the next-day effects associated with drinking alcohol,

our Party Complex formulation may help.

 

Alcohol is metabolized after consumption into two enzymes: alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Alcohol must be broken down into these enzymes for the body to eliminate it. ADH then breaks down alcohol to acetaldehyde, which is a highly toxic substance. Then acetaldehyde is broken down into acetate, which is broken down into water and carbon dioxide, and eliminated from the body (1).

Acetaldehyde is the most toxic, carcinogenic byproduct of alcohol breakdown in the body. Alcohol is metabolized mostly in the liver but also in the pancreas, brain and, gastrointestinal tract. Acetaldehyde damages tissues in these areas while it waits to be broken down into acetate (1).

The body and liver can only metabolize alcohol at a certain rate, regardless of how much alcohol a person consumes. Body mass, liver size, and genetic variations regarding how efficiently the enzymes ADH and ALDH function, impact how fast alcohol can be metabolized (1).

  • Dihydromyricetin (DHM) may decrease the amount of acetaldehyde in the human body (2). Although used for many years traditionally as Chinese medicine, scientific research on DHM and humans is scarce. DHM (Ampelopsin) is a flavonoid of the species Hovenia dulcis, otherwise known as the Japanese Raisin Tree (3). The most conclusive scientific research about DHM and alcohol has been studied in animals and has shown promise in the capability of reducing the oxidative stress alcohol puts on the body and may be able to lessen the effects of acute alcohol consumption (4, 5).

The adverse after-effects of drinking alcohol are typically symptoms of fatigue, weakness, thirst, headache, muscle aches, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, decreased sleep, sensitivity to light, sensitivity to sound, decreased attention, and decreased concentration. These effects you may experience may be a form of mild alcohol withdrawal, although it's different from alcohol withdrawal because the effects usually last a few hours rather than the several days associated with alcohol withdrawal. In each case, the unpleasant sensations begin within several hours of the ending of the drinking when the blood alcohol concentration starts to fall. (6).

  • N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine (NAC) is an antioxidant and precursor for the master antioxidant glutathione (1). Its functions have been well studied in humans and can provide many benefits that extend beyond its interactions with alcohol. Unfortunately, scientific research with NAC, alcohol, and humans is scarce. In animal research, NAC has provided restorative effects to liver tissue after alcohol consumption and has demonstrated the possibility of reducing the after-effects of alcohol. Some theorize that the specific after-effects of alcohol NAC may reduce are the common cluster of discomfort that people may experience, but since it is such a subjective topic, it is still being studied (7, 8).

The dehydration effect of alcohol causes electrolyte imbalance. Consuming approximately 4 drinks causes the body to lose up to 1 quart of water over just a few hours (6).

  • Magnesium is an electrolyte and essential mineral responsible for supporting bone and heart health and participates in over 300 enzyme processes in the body. Magnesium is found in dietary sources--but a typical modern diet leaves approximately 68% of adults getting less than the recommended daily amount needed for the body’s processes (9).
    • Alcohol depletes Magnesium from the body right away--in responsible drinkers who consume only one drink to those who are chronic consumers of alcohol (10).
  • Zinc is a trace element essential to the body (11).
    • Consumption of alcohol, especially chronic or heavy consumption of alcohol, leads to a deficiency, and alcohol decreases zinc absorption from dietary sources (12).
  • Vitamin B12 is a vitamin necessary for cell integrity, DNA methylation, and synthesis of nucleotides.
    • Moderate to heavy consumption of alcohol diminishes this vitamin (13).

Party Recovery Complex Mode of Action

Dihydromyricetin (DHM) is believed to involve GABA_a_R receptors (4) and reduces oxidative stress through its high superoxide radical scavenging ability, as well as inhibiting lipid peroxidation (5).

N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine (NAC) is an acetylated form of L-Cysteine, and by supplementing with NAC, there is more L-cysteine available to replenish Glutathione (14).

When NAC is available to a cell, it is hydrolyzed to release the cysteine amino acid and then synthesized into GSH via enzymatic reactions with c-glutamylcysteine synthetase and GSH synthetase. Glutathione synthesis is limited by the number of substrates that are available for it. Glutathione’s main function is to provide antioxidant defense, modulate oxidation-reduction reaction signal transduction, detoxify electrophilic xenobiotics, store and transport cysteine, regulate cell proliferation and synthesis of deoxyribonucleotide synthesis, regulate leukotriene and prostaglandin metabolism, and regulate immune system responses (15).

Magnesium Bisglycinate Chelate is a chelated amino acid where 2 glycine molecules (bisglycinate) are attached to the magnesium molecule. The bisglycinate form is stable and avoids a breakdown in the gastrointestinal tract before it is completely absorbed. The bisglycinate chelate aids in mineral absorption because it is a small sized molecule and can be absorbed directly by intestinal cells (11). The bisglycinate form of the mineral has one of the highest bioavailable absorption (9).

Pure Nootropics chooses to use the Magnesium Bisglycinate Chelate from TRAACS® by Albion Minerals for superior bioavailability. TRAACS® by Albion is a certification that the mineral content is guaranteed to be an authentic chelated mineral amino acid (11).

Zinc Bisglycinate Chelate is a trace element which has a higher bioavailability than zinc gluconate and other forms of zinc supplements. Its structure of a chelated amino acid means that there are 2 glycine molecules (bisglycinate) attached to the zinc molecule. The bisglycinate form is stable and avoids a breakdown in the gastrointestinal tract before it is completely absorbed. It is also tolerated better and has less gastrointestinal side effects. The bisglycinate chelate aids in mineral absorption because it is a small sized molecule and can be absorbed directly by intestinal cells (11)

Pure Nootropics chooses to use TRAACS® by Albion Minerals which is a certification that the mineral content is guaranteed to be an authentic chelated mineral amino acid for superior bioavailability (11).

DHM+ Dosage

Pure Nootropics’ DHM+ provides 300 mg Dihydromyricetin, 300 mg N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine, 20 mg Zinc (as bisglycinate chelate), 24 mg Magnesium (as bisglycinate chelate), and 495 mcg Vitamin B12 (as methylcobalamin). Suggested use for adults is to take 1 capsule by mouth before consuming alcohol. Take 1 or 2 additional capsules after drinking, with a glass of water.

DHM+ Toxicity

  • Dihydromyricetin (DHM): The lethal oral dose in mice was greater than 5 g/kg (16).
  • N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine (NAC): The lethal dose for NAC was greater than 1000 mg/kg in dogs, between 2500-6000 mg/kg in rats, and 3575 mg/kg in mice (17).
  • Magnesium: The RDA (Recommended Daily Allowance) for Magnesium for adults 18-30 is: females 310 mg, males 410 mg; and adults 31 and older is: females 320 mg, males 420 mg (9).

The lethal dose of magnesium oxide for female rats was 3990 mg/kg; for male rats 3870 mg/kg; and for mice 810 mg/kg (18).

  • Zinc: The tolerable upper intake level is 40 mg/day for adults (19).
  • Vitamin B12: No upper intake level has been determined (20).

 

If you are taking any medications, always consult with you Healthcare Practitioner before beginning any new supplement.

For further information, please see our References Tab above.

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Reference

The references below are not meant to imply that any of our products treat, cure, or diagnose any disease or human condition. References to clinical studies and pre-clinical studies may use varying dosages and may not represent the dosages or subsequent results of products we sell; however, the references provided are pertinent to the subject supplement itself. References provided are intended for research and informational purposes only and do not represent the entire body of knowledge available on the subject(s) referenced; nor do they represent all possible outcomes associated with the subject(s) referenced including, but not limited to, adverse effects, precautions, or chemical interactions within the human body. The Content provided on this website is not intended to be a replacement for professional medical advice, treatment or diagnosis. Never ignore the advice of a medical professional or delay in attaining professional advice because of information or impressions you gather on this website. Choosing to rely on any information provided by the Content of this website is solely at your own risk. We encourage our audience to do their own research beyond the resources we have provided so your decision is as educated as possible.

 Dihydromyricetin (DHM):

• May decrease acetaldehyde (the toxic metabolite of alcohol) in humans*
Okuma, Yutaka, et al. “Effect of Extracts from Hovenia Dulcis Thunb. on Alcohol Concentration in Rats and Men Administered Alcohol.” Nippon Eiyo Shokuryo Gakkaishi, vol. 48, no. 3, 1995, pp. 167–172., doi: https://doi.org/10.4327/jsnfs.48.167.
• May improve lipid metabolism*
Chen, Shihui, et al. “Dihydromyricetin Improves Glucose and Lipid Metabolism and Exerts Anti-Inflammatory Effects…: A Randomized Controlled Trial.” Pharmacological Research, vol. 99, Sept. 2015, pp. 74–81., doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phrs.2015.05.009.
• May lessen the effects of alcohol consumption (in rats)*
Shen, Yi et al. “Dihydromyricetin as a novel anti-alcohol intoxication medication.” The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience vol. 32,1 (2012): 390-401. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4639-11.2012
• May reduce oxidative stress on liver after alcohol consumption (in mice)*
Wang, Mingchun, et al. “Preliminary Characterization, Antioxidant Activity in Vitro and Hepatoprotective Effect on Acute Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury in Mice of Polysaccharides from the Peduncles of Hovenia Dulcis.” Food and Chemical Toxicology, vol. 50, no. 9, Sept. 2012, pp. 2964–2970., doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2012.06.034.
 N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine (NAC):

• May provide restorative effects to liver tissue after alcohol consumption (in rats)*
Jaya, D.S., Augustine, J. & Menon, V.P. Indian J Clin Biochem (1994) 9: 64. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02869573.
• May reduce the adverse after-effects of alcohol consumption (in rats)*
Ferreira Seiva, FR, et al. “Effects of N-Acetylcysteine on Alcohol Abstinence and Alcohol-Induced Adverse Effects in Rats.” Alcohol., vol. 43, no. 2, Mar. 2009, pp. 127–35., doi:10.1016/j.alcohol.2008.12.003.

1. “Alcohol Metabolism: An Update.” National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, vol. 72, July 2007, pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/aa72/aa72.htm.
2. Okuma, Yutaka, et al. “Effect of Extracts from Hovenia Dulcis Thunb. on Alcohol Concentration in Rats and Men Administered Alcohol.” Nippon Eiyo Shokuryo Gakkaishi, vol. 48, no. 3, 1995, pp. 167–172., doi: https://doi.org/10.4327/jsnfs.48.167.
3. “Hovenia dulcis”. Examine.com, Published Jul 12, 2013. Last updated Oct 10, 2018. https://examine.com/supplements/hovenia-dulcis/#ref10.
4. Shen, Yi et al. “Dihydromyricetin as a novel anti-alcohol intoxication medication.” The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience vol. 32,1 (2012): 390-401. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4639-11.2012
5. Wang, Mingchun, et al. “Preliminary Characterization, Antioxidant Activity in Vitro and Hepatoprotective Effect on Acute Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury in Mice of Polysaccharides from the Peduncles of Hovenia Dulcis.” Food and Chemical Toxicology, vol. 50, no. 9, Sept. 2012, pp. 2964–2970., doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2012.06.034.
6. Swift, Robert, and Dena Davidson. “Alcohol Hangover: Mechanisms and Mediators.” pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh22-1/54-60.pdf.
7. Jaya, D.S., Augustine, J. & Menon, V.P. Indian J Clin Biochem (1994) 9: 64. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02869573.
8. Ferreira Seiva, FR, et al. “Effects of N-Acetylcysteine on Alcohol Abstinence and Alcohol-Induced Adverse Effects in Rats.” Alcohol., vol. 43, no. 2, Mar. 2009, pp. 127–35., doi:10.1016/j.alcohol.2008.12.003.
9. “Magnesium,” Examine.com, published on 8 December 2013, last updated on 15 October 2018, https://examine.com/supplements/magnesium/.
10. Rivlin, RS. “Magnesium Deficiency and Alcohol Intake: Mechanisms, Clinical Significance and Possible Relation to Cancer Development (A Review).” Journal of the American College of Nutrition, vol. 13, no. 5, Nov. 1994, pp. 416–23., doi:10.1080/07315724.1994.10718430.
11. Cook, Sarah. “Chelated Minerals: Addressing Key Challenges in Mineral Supplementation”.Natural Medicine Journal, 2018, https://www.naturalmedicinejournal.com/sites/default/files/uploads/chelated_minerals.pdf.
12. McClain, Craig J., and Le-Chu Su. “Zinc Deficiency in the Alcoholic: A Review.” Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 7, no. 1, Jan. 1983, onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1530-0277.1983.tb05402.x.
13. Laufer, EM, et al. “Effects of Moderate Alcohol Consumption on Folate and Vitamin B(12) Status in Postmenopausal Women.” Eur J Clin Nutr., vol. 58, no. 11, Nov. 2004, pp. 1518–24., www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15138463.
14. “N-Acetylcysteine”. Examine.com, published Sep 11, 2013. Last updated Jun 14, 2018. https://examine.com/supplements/n-acetylcysteine/.
15. Bavarsad Shahripour, Reza et al. “N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in neurological disorders: mechanisms of action and therapeutic opportunities.” Brain and behavior vol. 4,2 (2014): 108-22. doi:10.1002/brb3.208.
16. “Dihydromyricetin Safety Data Sheet.” Cayman Chemicals, www.caymanchem.com/msdss/23549m.pdf.
17. “N-Acetyl Cysteine”. Food, Herbs & Supplements, Professional. Natural Medicines, Therapeutic Research, https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/databases/food,-herbs-supplements/professional.aspx?productid=1018#adverseEvents.
18. “Magnesium Oxice.” ToxNet, Toxicology Data Network, toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/search/a?dbs hsdb:@term @DOCNO 1652.
19. “Zinc”. Food, Herbs & Supplements, Professional. Natural Medicines, Therapeutic Research, https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/databases/food,-herbs-supplements/professional.aspx?productid=982#toxicology.
20. Institute of Medicine (US) Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes and its Panel on Folate, Other B Vitamins, and Choline. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 1998. 9, Vitamin B12. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK114302/.

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DHM Plus Capsules

DHM Plus Capsules

$14.99
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