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DHM Plus Capsules

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PRODUCT INFORMATION
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PRODUCT INFORMATION

Pure Nootropics’ DHM Plus is formulated with ingredients to help you recover from the unwanted after-effects of alcohol consumption.

  • Dihydromyricetin (DHM):
    • Post-alcohol consumption liver support (ref)*
  • N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine (NAC):
    • Provides free radicals protection and helps maintain cellular protection (4)
  • Magnesium, Zinc and Vitamin B12:
    • Promotes replenishment of essential minerals and vitamins*

DHM+ Benefits

DHM Plus (formerly Party Recovery Complex) is one of our most innovative products to help you recover after you’ve indulged in too many of the good things in life.  Take regrets about last night off the list by functioning better and recovering quicker with our expertly-formulated blend—so you can keep enjoying your favorite recreational activities without the dreaded cognitive walk of shame!

Equal Parts Replenishment & Damage Control

                When you’ve had one too many nights out or binged on your favorite drink, it’s time to focus on recovery.  One of the most overlooked aspects to recovery is focusing on not just feeling better immediately (crushing headache, anyone?), but understanding why you’re feeling so lousy in the first place.

                In the instance of consuming too much alcohol, those feelings that come afterward are a direct result of the toxic metabolite of alcohol:  acetaldehyde. As your liver works overtime to process large amounts of alcohol, acetaldehyde is made as byproduct.  The worst part about acetaldehyde?  It causes damage to whatever tissues it contacts.  And not just the in the liver:  acetaldehyde is produced in the brain where alcohol is also metabolized.

                Combined with the dehydrating effects of drinking (and the general lack of sleep that usually accompanies long nights partying), your body is going to send all sorts of uncomfortable signals your way to tell you it needs a little extra TLC to recover.

                What your brain and body can’t tell you—and most people don’t know—is that the consumption of alcohol and partying also depletes valuable and essential minerals.  Some of these minerals (such as Magnesium and Zinc) and Vitamin B12 are nootropics in their own right. 

                Dealing with your body detoxing, not sleeping regularly, and depleting these nootropic compounds is going to take a lot more to fix than just a cup of black coffee the next morning.

 

For Damage Control:

DHM:  A specific type of flavonoid from the Japanese Raisin Tree is here to clean up the ill-effects of acetaldehyde.  DHM supports liver health by promoting alcohol metabolism with a decreased amount of this toxic byproduct (1, 2).

NAC:  Amino acid N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine (NAC) provides free radicals protection and helps maintain cellular protection (4).

For Replenishment:

Magnesium:  Depleted immediately after alcohol consumption, magnesium isn’t something you want to be without!  It’s an essential mineral and electrolyte that supports the nervous system, along with over 300 other necessary processes in the body for bone and heart health, and chances are your diet isn’t supplying enough of it to begin with.  Even in people who consume alcohol moderately and could be considered the most responsible of drinkers, magnesium stores are taxed.  Magnesium helps support mood, sleep, and helps keep your electrolytes balanced, so you’ll definitely want more of this in your life after a long night out! (9, 10)

Zinc:  Another essential component of the body that’s quick to leave your body before you leave the party is zinc.  Consuming alcohol depletes zinc and leaves you in a vicious cycle because the alcohol itself makes it harder for you to absorb zinc from the food you eat (11, 12).

Vitamin B12:  We mentioned this in our last segment of this series, but Vitamin B12 is an essential vitamin which alcohol wipes out.  Keeping your B12 levels up is an important part of nervous system health, mood balance, and promotes cognitive performance (13)

DHM+ Dosage

Pure Nootropics’ DHM+ provides 300 mg Dihydromyricetin, 300 mg N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine, 20 mg Zinc (as bisglycinate chelate), 24 mg Magnesium (as bisglycinate chelate), and 495 mcg Vitamin B12 (as methylcobalamin). Suggested use for adults is to take 1 capsule by mouth before consuming alcohol. Take 1 or 2 additional capsules after drinking, with a glass of water.

     

    If you are taking any medications, always consult with you Healthcare Practitioner before beginning any new supplement.

    For further information, please see our References Tab above.

    Reference

    The references below are not meant to imply that any of our products treat, cure, or diagnose any disease or human condition. References to clinical studies and pre-clinical studies may use varying dosages and may not represent the dosages or subsequent results of products we sell; however, the references provided are pertinent to the subject supplement itself. References provided are intended for research and informational purposes only and do not represent the entire body of knowledge available on the subject(s) referenced; nor do they represent all possible outcomes associated with the subject(s) referenced including, but not limited to, adverse effects, precautions, or chemical interactions within the human body. The Content provided on this website is not intended to be a replacement for professional medical advice, treatment or diagnosis. Never ignore the advice of a medical professional or delay in attaining professional advice because of information or impressions you gather on this website. Choosing to rely on any information provided by the Content of this website is solely at your own risk. We encourage our audience to do their own research beyond the resources we have provided so your decision is as educated as possible.

     Dihydromyricetin (DHM):

    Post-alcohol consumption liver support *
    Okuma, Yutaka, et al. “Effect of Extracts from Hovenia Dulcis Thunb. on Alcohol Concentration in Rats and Men Administered Alcohol.” Nippon Eiyo Shokuryo Gakkaishi, vol. 48, no. 3, 1995, pp. 167–172., doi: https://doi.org/10.4327/jsnfs.48.167.

     N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine (NAC):

    • Provides free radicals protection and helps maintain cellular protection (4)*

     

    1. “Alcohol Metabolism: An Update.” National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, vol. 72, July 2007, pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/aa72/aa72.htm.
    2. Okuma, Yutaka, et al. “Effect of Extracts from Hovenia Dulcis Thunb. on Alcohol Concentration in Rats and Men Administered Alcohol.” Nippon Eiyo Shokuryo Gakkaishi, vol. 48, no. 3, 1995, pp. 167–172., doi: https://doi.org/10.4327/jsnfs.48.167.
    3. “Hovenia dulcis”. Examine.com, Published Jul 12, 2013. Last updated Oct 10, 2018. https://examine.com/supplements/hovenia-dulcis/#ref10.
    4. Shen, Yi et al. “Dihydromyricetin as a novel anti-alcohol intoxication medication.” The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience vol. 32,1 (2012): 390-401. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4639-11.2012
    5. Wang, Mingchun, et al. “Preliminary Characterization, Antioxidant Activity in Vitro and Hepatoprotective Effect on Acute Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury in Mice of Polysaccharides from the Peduncles of Hovenia Dulcis.” Food and Chemical Toxicology, vol. 50, no. 9, Sept. 2012, pp. 2964–2970., doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2012.06.034.
    6. Swift, Robert, and Dena Davidson. “Alcohol Hangover: Mechanisms and Mediators.” pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh22-1/54-60.pdf.
    7. Jaya, D.S., Augustine, J. & Menon, V.P. Indian J Clin Biochem (1994) 9: 64. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02869573.
    8. Ferreira Seiva, FR, et al. “Effects of N-Acetylcysteine on Alcohol Abstinence and Alcohol-Induced Adverse Effects in Rats.” Alcohol., vol. 43, no. 2, Mar. 2009, pp. 127–35., doi:10.1016/j.alcohol.2008.12.003.
    9. “Magnesium,” Examine.com, published on 8 December 2013, last updated on 15 October 2018, https://examine.com/supplements/magnesium/.
    10. Rivlin, RS. “Magnesium Deficiency and Alcohol Intake: Mechanisms, Clinical Significance and Possible Relation to Cancer Development (A Review).” Journal of the American College of Nutrition, vol. 13, no. 5, Nov. 1994, pp. 416–23., doi:10.1080/07315724.1994.10718430.
    11. Cook, Sarah. “Chelated Minerals: Addressing Key Challenges in Mineral Supplementation”.Natural Medicine Journal, 2018, https://www.naturalmedicinejournal.com/sites/default/files/uploads/chelated_minerals.pdf.
    12. McClain, Craig J., and Le-Chu Su. “Zinc Deficiency in the Alcoholic: A Review.” Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 7, no. 1, Jan. 1983, onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1530-0277.1983.tb05402.x.
    13. Laufer, EM, et al. “Effects of Moderate Alcohol Consumption on Folate and Vitamin B(12) Status in Postmenopausal Women.” Eur J Clin Nutr., vol. 58, no. 11, Nov. 2004, pp. 1518–24., www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15138463.
    14. “N-Acetylcysteine”. Examine.com, published Sep 11, 2013. Last updated Jun 14, 2018. https://examine.com/supplements/n-acetylcysteine/.
    15. Bavarsad Shahripour, Reza et al. “N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in neurological disorders: mechanisms of action and therapeutic opportunities.” Brain and behavior vol. 4,2 (2014): 108-22. doi:10.1002/brb3.208.
    16. “Dihydromyricetin Safety Data Sheet.” Cayman Chemicals, www.caymanchem.com/msdss/23549m.pdf.
    17. “N-Acetyl Cysteine”. Food, Herbs & Supplements, Professional. Natural Medicines, Therapeutic Research, https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/databases/food,-herbs-supplements/professional.aspx?productid=1018#adverseEvents.
    18. “Magnesium Oxice.” ToxNet, Toxicology Data Network, toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/search/a?dbs hsdb:@term @DOCNO 1652.
    19. “Zinc”. Food, Herbs & Supplements, Professional. Natural Medicines, Therapeutic Research, https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/databases/food,-herbs-supplements/professional.aspx?productid=982#toxicology.
    20. Institute of Medicine (US) Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes and its Panel on Folate, Other B Vitamins, and Choline. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 1998. 9, Vitamin B12. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK114302/.

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    DHM Plus Capsules

    DHM Plus Capsules

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