Hot
New
Out stock

Nicotinamide Mononucleotide (NMN)

SKU: 3985690

$19.99

45 people are viewing this item

26 people have bought this item

Hurry up! Sales Ends In

Order in the next to get it by
Spend $40.00 to Free Shipping
PRODUCT INFORMATION
CUSTOMER REVIEWS
reference
lab result
PRODUCT INFORMATION

NMN is a NAD+ precursor which supports healthy aging.

NMN Benefits

  • Passed initial safety study in first clinical trial in humans 11/2019 (ref)*

Nicotinamide Mononucleotide (NMN) is emerging as a subject of interest in the medical community, but thus far, there has not been research or trials conducted with humans, except for the studies referenced above.*

The following are examples of dynamics associated with NMN through the animal model and may not be representative of the effects in the human body:

  • Protects the brain’s blood vessels during aging (in mice)(ref)* Cerebromicrovascular circulation is associated with healthy cognition during aging.
  • Increases telomere length (in mouse liver cells)(ref)* Telomeres are the ends of chromosomes which shorten with age.
  • Increases sirtuin1 gene activity (in mice)(ref)* Sirtuins are molecules which reduces cellular damage and aging.

NMN Mechanism of Action

Nicotinamide Mononucleotide (NMN) is a nucleotide which is a precursor to NAD (Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide). NAD is a cofactor found in all living cells and is necessary for cellular reactions. NAD carries electrons between reactions and exists in an oxidized form (NAD+) or a reduced form (NADH) (1).

Maintaining higher levels of NAD increases levels of the energy molecule, ATP, and is vital to DNA repair, gene expression, and signaling between cells. Lower levels of NAD are associated with aging and age-related degeneration (2).

Many NAD precursors are available as supplements to increase levels of NAD in the body. Each precursor has a unique pathway which usually involves breaking down into Nicotinamide Riboside (NR). NR is a type of Vitamin B3 (3). Like NR, Nicotinamide Mononucleotide can be found in some food sources, but only in trace amounts. These food sources include broccoli, cabbage, cucumbers, tomatoes, avocados, and edamame (4).

It was previously believed that NR was the only NAD precursor that could enter the cell, and that supplementing with NR was a more direct way to synthesize NAD. Generally, NMN requires an extra step which converts NMN into NR before entering the cell and then is converted back into NMN through another phosphorylation process (5).

However, scientists recently discovered that a membrane protein (Slc12a8) is specific for NMN transport directly across the cell membrane and into the cell. This protein requires sodium in order to transport the NMN (5).

The majority of the cells which NMN enters can be found in the pancreas, small intestine, liver, and adipose tissue (fat tissue). NMN can be found in the bloodstream as quickly as 5 minutes after being absorbed from the small intestine in mice, and it is distributed into the body tissues quickly thereafter and converted into NAD (6).

NMN has advantages over other NAD precursors, specifically regarding Sirtuin interactions (7).

NMN is currently being studied for its effects in humans, though most of the studies on NAD precursors in humans have been conducted with NR. The scientific research for NMN that is plentiful involves animal studies; however, NMN’s safety profile in humans was recently released in November, 2019 and appears to be a feasible supplement for humans (8).

NMN Side Effects & Toxicity

As stated above, NMN’s complete safety profile in humans is being investigated.

In mice, administering a very high dosage (that is much higher than the recommended human dosage) over a period of a year did not cause any side effects or toxicity. Due to the short lifespan of mice (approximately 2 years), the administration of NMN over 1 year has been likened to administration equal to half their lives (4).

For more information, please see our references tab.

CUSTOMER REVIEWS

Customer Reviews

Based on 3 reviews Write a review
Reference

The references below are not meant to imply that any of our products treat, cure, or diagnose any disease or human condition. This product is sold as a research chemical and is for research purposes only; we recommend consulting a professional about how to handle this chemical. References to clinical studies and pre-clinical studies may use varying dosages and may not represent the dosages or subsequent results of products we sell; however, the references provided are pertinent to the subject supplement itself. References provided are intended for research and informational purposes only and do not represent the entire body of knowledge available on the subject(s) referenced; nor do they represent all possible outcomes associated with the subject(s) referenced including, but not limited to, adverse effects, precautions, or chemical interactions within the human body. The Content provided on this website is not intended to be a replacement for professional medical advice, treatment or diagnosis. Never ignore the advice of a medical professional or delay in attaining professional advice because of information or impressions you gather on this website. Choosing to rely on any information provided by the Content of this website is solely at your own risk. We encourage our audience to do their own research beyond the resources we have provided so your decision is as educated as possible.

• Passed initial safety study in first clinical trial in humans 11/2019*
Irie, J, et al. “Effect of Oral Administration of Nicotinamide Mononucleotide on Clinical Parameters and Nicotinamide Metabolite Levels in Healthy Japanese Men.” Endocr J., 2 Nov. 2019, doi:10.1507/endocrj.EJ19-0313.
The following are examples of dynamics associated with NMN through the animal model and may not be representative of the effects in the human body:
• Protects the brain’s blood vessels during aging (in mice)*
Tarantini, Stefano et al. “Nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) supplementation rescues cerebromicrovascular endothelial function and neurovascular coupling responses and improves cognitive function in aged mice.” Redox biology vol. 24 (2019): 101192. doi:10.1016/j.redox.2019.101192
• Increases telomere length (in mouse liver cells)*
Amano, H, et al. “Telomere Dysfunction Induces Sirtuin Repression That Drives Telomere-Dependent Disease.” Cell Metab., vol. 29, no. 6, 4 June 2019, doi:10.1016/j.cmet.2019.03.00.
• Increases sirtuin1 gene activity (in mice)*
“Nicotinamide Mononucleotide, an NAD Precursor, Rescues Age-Associated Susceptibility to AKI in a Sirtuin 1–Dependent Manner.” Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, vol. 28, no. 8, Aug. 2017, pp. 2337–2352., doi:https://doi.org/10.1681/ASN.2016040385.

1. “Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide.” Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicotinamide_adenine_dinucleotide.

2. Aman, Yahyah, et al. “Therapeutic Potential of Boosting NAD in Aging and Age-Related Diseases.” Translational Medicine of Aging, vol. 2, Jan. 2018, pp. 30–37., doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tma.2018.08.003.

3. Chi, Yuling, and Anthony A. Suave. “Nicotinamide Riboside, a Trace Nutrient in Foods, Is a Vitamin B3 with Effects on Energy Metabolism and Neuroprotection.” Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care, vol. 16, 2013, pp. 657–661., doi:10.1097/MCO.0b013e32836510c0.

4. Mills, Kathryn F., et al. “Long-Term Administration of Nicotinamide Mononucleotide Mitigates Age-Associated Physiological Decline in Mice.” Cell Metabolism, vol. 24, no. 6, 13 Dec. 2016, pp. 795–806., doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2016.09.013.

5. Hill, Steve. “NMN Enters Cells via Newly Discovered Pathway.” 9 Jan. 2019, https://www.leafscience.org/nad-transporter-identified/.

6. Grozio, Alessia, et al. “Slc12a8 Is a Nicotinamide Mononucleotide Transporter.” Nature Metabolism, vol. 1, 2019, pp. 47–57., https://www.nature.com/articles/s42255-018-0009-4.

7. “Nicotinamide Mononucleotide, an NAD Precursor, Rescues Age-Associated Susceptibility to AKI in a Sirtuin 1–Dependent Manner.” Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, vol. 28, no. 8, Aug. 2017, pp. 2337–2352., doi:https://doi.org/10.1681/ASN.2016040385.

8. Irie, J, et al. “Effect of Oral Administration of Nicotinamide Mononucleotide on Clinical Parameters and Nicotinamide Metabolite Levels in Healthy Japanese Men.” Endocr J., 2 Nov. 2019, doi:10.1507/endocrj.EJ19-0313.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website.

Nicotinamide Mononucleotide (NMN)

Nicotinamide Mononucleotide (NMN)

$19.99
Pre-loader